Open Trends — Ubuntu 7.10 a.k.a. Gutsy Gibbon

Ubuntu 7.10, sporting the code name of Gutsy Gibbon, is the much anticipated and latest release of the GNOME-centric Linux distribution. Ubuntu has progressed swiftly in the Linux world from its “Warty” beginning to become the most used desktop distribution and has spun off several editions of equal respect in the forms of Kubuntu (KDE-centric), Xubuntu (XFCE-centric), Edubuntu (education targeted), and Gobuntu (Free Software Foundation adherent). Ubuntu has also been targeting server installations with increased interests.

Ubuntu first resided on my computer’s hard drive in a brief trial of 4.10 Warty Warthog, which did not last long. It lasted long enough to return to SUSE and PCLinuxOS. I tried it again with 5.04, Hoary Hedgehog, and found a worthy desktop, although it shared my hard drive with SUSE and PCLinuxOS. Making the move from KDE to GNOME was done with some trepidation, as I was very comfortable with KDE. I remained with PCLinuxOS as my main distribution. I did not realized that PCLinuxOS’ APT package manager was preparing me for a move to simplify my Linux upon one distribution.

Breezy Badger (Ubuntu 5.10) arrived as I was seeking a simplification of my computing usage. I had decided to drop Windows XP Professional from the hard drive. Also leaving a partition at this point was SUSE. I sought to abolish RPM dependency hell from my computing experience. The APT package manager greatly simplified the installation and removal of software. I was wanting an easier Linux experience. I was tired of spending days and weeks adjusting each Linux distribution on my computer to fill my needs.

When Dapper Drake (6.06 LTS) was installed on my computer, I opted to give it my entire hard drive. By then GNOME’s simplified, yet adjustable GUI meshed with what I wanted from a Linux installation. My computer setup also followed the path to simplification of lifestyle that I continue along. Each Ubuntu release in the forms of 6.10 (Edgy Eft) and 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) has solidified the quest for ease of installation and configuration.

Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) is the present acme of ease and simplicity, as well as a path to a beautiful future. I have installed it on three different computers. My computer was upgraded from 7.04 to Gutsy Gibbon’s release client for a week before the official 7.10 updates took effect. My wife’s computer was upgraded in the same matter. Our Dell Inspiron 8100 laptop saw its home directory backup to my computer and a fresh installation of Gutsy went on it.

There were no problems with any of them, except for a minor problem with getting a networked printer installed to the laptop via the built-in printer administration utility. Bringing up the CUPS’ HTML configuration page via Firefox allowed me to link to the printer and print a test page. The Belkin Wireless G Plus notebook card (F5D701) was recognized and enabled without a problem. Even the volume buttons on the laptop worked fresh off installation.

Take any of the top Linux distributions and you will find similar results. Windows’ monopoly of the desktop is about to be shattered. With the plethora of quality software available for Linux, with the easy of installation, maintenance, and use of Linux, and with the solid security of Linux, why would anyone not consider Linux for his or her computer’s operating system? If you want a better computer experience than the stale one you have settled for, then pick Linux. If you want to look at the world outside through Windows, then you’ll never experience the exhilaration of feeling the winds of change within your soul.

It really is a simple choice.

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